Posts Tagged ‘author’

An Opportunity for Authors

December 28, 2009

Social media guru Chris Brogan blogs today about a book he read during the Christmas holiday and how well the author, Scott Westerfeld, communicates with his readers via the Internet.

Brogan makes the statement, “Fans are no longer silent onlookers in the experience of books. They are participants.” He continues by saying books are “…a user-driven media where readers and sometimes authors congregate.” He points out that books don’t have to be limited to a rectangle of paper. Today there are printed books, audio books, ebooks, Kindle books, etc. The form of books, Brogan writes, or “the media” is just one facet of their essence.

“If a book is a media where readers and sometimes authors congregate – CONGREGATE – it means that authors get the opportunity to build relationships in a whole new way with readers. It means that the stories don’t have to stay linear, that the ideas don’t have to stay on one side of the page, that the experiences don’t have to end at the edge of the page.”

That’s a powerful statement for authors. Brogan continues, “…the opportunity to empower your audience to actually be a community is a huge one, and shouldn’t be shrugged off without consideration. Not only could authors create differently…they have the chance to build relationships of value, that will work in their favor for future projects.”

Stated another way, the opportunity for all authors who write to make a difference in the world no longer ends when the manuscript is complete or the book is printed. Now authors can engage their readers long after they’ve read and absorbed the message between the covers. Now authors – and readers – can dialog about those messages, can expand on messages for even greater change in our world.

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5 Tips for Targeting Your Blog

June 24, 2009

Writing stuff people actually care about is what we authors do. Right?

Trouble is, that’s sometimes incredibly difficult. Here are 5 specific steps to blogging that make targeting our messages considerably easier than crafting 50,000- or 100,000-word books.

  1. Test. Blogs let you discover what kind of content your public wants to read. What makes them subscribe to your blog, eagerly searching their email or RSS notifications for the latest wisdom from your keyboard? Write a few blogs and watch the “views per day” statistics. This same blog you’re now (more…)

Why Inbound Marketing?

June 17, 2009

Used to be when you had a product or service to sell, you figured out how to tell the world. You took your product to the marketplace (farmer’s market) or you bought or begged attention (advertising, public relations) or bugged people into trying your product (sales, direct mail, telemarketing, etc). It was you who went after customers.

For authors and publishers, that meant all the above, plus whirlwind tours of the country appearing on radio and television shows, holding book signings, conducting readings at local libraries, trekking to local bookstores with signed copies in hand, and meeting and greeting as many people as possible. All  that was what one of my favorite social media marketers, Hubspot, calls “interruption marketing.” (more…)

How To Increase Your Platform

June 2, 2009

So, the last time we chatted we talked about the need, and the opportunity, for authors to build their “platforms” via social media. Whether blogs or Facebook or Tangle or Twitter or YouTube or other online communities, generating a following is easy enough from the technology end.

As authors know, the hardest part of writing is staring at the blank screen. Whatever will you write? Whatever do you have to say that’s interesting and/or useful to anybody, let alone the entire blogosphere?

Wait a minute! You just wrote an entire book. Or you’re in the midst of writing one, right? What’s your subject matter? Can you expound on a specific fact beyond the scope of your book? If you’re a chemist (pay attention, Richard), what new developments are there in the world of beakers and test tubes? If you’re a geologist or (more…)

How Online Visibility Helps Authors Get Published

May 22, 2009

More and more often, publishers are requiring authors have “platforms” before considering their books for publication. Many authors, however, especially those who are unpublished, wonder how they’ll generate a “platform” if no one will publish their book.

Call it a platform, a community, a following, or a tribe, it’s much easier increasing one’s visibility to readers these days, thanks to the Internet and the World Wide Web. Authors who are passionate about the subject of their book can easily blog about said subject or speak to local groups or write columns for appropriate periodicals, thus creating the “platform.” When readers discover useful and valuable information in those blogs or columns or speeches, they’ll gladly tell their friends and associates. Many will recommend authors or books in their own blogs.

Today’s tip: Make your blog useful to readers. David Meerman Scott tells about an author who wrote about (more…)